Norfolk Constabulary

POLICE CONNECT MESSAGE – HMRC SCAMS

Police are warning residents to be wary of cold callers following incidents in the county.

Officers have received around 100 calls this week from residents concerned about cold calls from scammers claiming to be from HMRC.

In most cases, scammers have claimed to be from HMRC stating that the person is involved owes payment for a fine. Often this includes leaving a message on answer phones asking the public to call to make payments/ threatening arrest for non-payment and requesting i-tunes vouchers or bitcoins used to pay the debt – these then ask the recipients to call them to make payment or read the codes off the back of vouchers.

Resident should put the phone down on these callers and no money/ vouchers should ever be handed over as these are scam calls.

An HMRC spokesperson said: “HMRC takes security extremely seriously. We are aware that some people have received telephone calls from individuals claiming to be from HMRC. We have a well-known brand, which criminals abuse to add credibility to their scams.

“These scams often involve people receiving a call out of the blue and being told that HMRC is investigating them. If you can’t verify the identity of the caller, we recommend that you do not speak to them.


Anyone concerned about incidents should follow this advice:

HMRC Advice:

1. Recognise the signs – genuine organisations like banks and HMRC will never contact you out of the blue to ask for your PIN, password or bank details.

2. Stay safe – don’t give out private information, reply to text messages, download attachments or click on links in emails you weren’t expecting.

3. Take action – forward suspicious emails claiming to be from HMRC to phishing@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk and texts to 60599, or contact Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 to report any suspicious calls or use their online fraud reporting tool.

4. Check GOV.UK for information on how to avoid and report scams and recognise genuine HMRC contact.

5. If you think you have received an HMRC related phishing/bogus email or text message, you can check it against the examples shown in this guide.

Additional advice:

· HMRC will call people about outstanding tax bills, and sometimes use automated messages, however this would include a taxpayer reference number. If uncertain of the caller we would advise customers to hang up and call HMRC directly to check – customers can confirm our call centre numbers on GOV.UK. For tax credits we do not include customer details in any voicemail messages.

· HMRC Debt management teams do contact members of the public by phone about paying outstanding debts.

· If a customer (or agent) isn’t confident that the call is from HMRC, we will ask them to call back. Depending on the circumstances and to give the customer confidence it is actually HMRC calling, information may be disclosed to the caller which only HMRC is party to.

· Calls from the majority of HMRC offices will leave caller identification data, i.e. the number the caller has used to contact you from

· For up to date advice on scam HMRC phone calls, visit GOV.UK – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/phishing-and-bogus-emails-hm-revenue-and-customs-examples/phishing-emails-and-bogus-contact-hm-revenue-and-customs-examples#bogus-callers

Attleborough Newsletter – July 2018

Please see below or follow below link.

Attleborough July 18

 

Attleborough Newsletter – June 2018

Please see below newsletter or follow attached link.

Attleborough June

 

Community Engagement Officer Newsletter

Bedingfield Forest News letter Jan 18

Engagement Officers launch new project ‘Community SOS’

Engagement Officers launch new project ‘Community SOS’

A new project is being launched by Norfolk Constabulary’s seven Engagement Officers in a bid to build stronger links with local communities. Called ‘Community SOS’, they will as a group give up a day, when not on duty, to assist with a local project in their district. The officers have been in post for a year, with their roles supporting existing community relationships by growing new local activities and providing enhanced visibility in every district. This is through the use of social media, Police Connect and frequent face-to-face meetings. Additionally, the officers are supporting and increasing the use of Special Constables, Police Cadets, Police Support Volunteers, Neighbourhood Watch and Community Speed Watch schemes.

The seven officers are:

• PC Emily Carter – King’s Lynn and West Norfolk
• PC Amy Lucas – Breckland
• PC Adam Binns – Norwich
• PC Hannah Gardiner – Great Yarmouth
• PC Jim Squires – South Norfolk
• PC Andy Mason – Broadland
• PC Pete Davison – North Norfolk

PC Jim Squires said “We have just launched this initiative and need your help! “We are looking for a community project for each of the seven districts, which could do with a little help. “If you have a village hall that needs a re-paint or an over-grown garden that needs tidying up, we want to come along and help for the day. “The Police Cadets are also available to come and help if it requires more man-power.”

The closing date for people to send their ‘Community SOS’ request in is Tuesday 31 October 2017. The Engagement Officers will then choose one project to help with in each district and will contact the coordinator directly to arrange dates and times. If you have a project suitable for this, please send a brief, which is no more than 500 words, along with any pictures to: squiresjr@norfolk.pnn.police.uk by the closing date.

POLICE APPEAL UPDATE

A 58 year old man wanted in connection with breaching the terms of his licence has been arrested.
Michael Dunn was arrested last night (Wednesday 2 August) just after 8.30pm in Eye, taken to Martlesham Police Investigation Centre and returned to the prison system this morning.

Action Fraud Message

This message is being broadcast on behalf of Action Fraud

Following the ransomware cyber attack on Friday 12 May which affected the NHS and is believed to have affected other organisations globally, the City of London Police’s National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has issued an alert urging both individuals and businesses to follow protection advice immediately and in the coming days.

Ransomware is a form of malicious software (Malware) that enables cyber criminals to remotely lock down files on your computer or mobile device. Criminals will use ransomware to extort money from you (a ransom), before they restore access to your files. There are many ways that ransomware can infect your device, whether it be a link to a malicious website in an unsolicited email, or through a security vulnerability in a piece of software you use.

Key Protect messages for businesses to protect themselves from ransomware:

  • Install system and application updates on all devices as soon as they become available.
  • Install anti-virus software on all devices and keep it updated.
  • Create regular backups of your important files to a device that isn’t left connected to your network as any malware infection could spread to that too.

The National Cyber Security Centre’s technical guidance includes specific software patches to use that will prevent uninfected computers on your network from becoming infected with the “WannaCry” Ransomware: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/ransomware-latest-ncsc-guidance

For additional in-depth technical guidance on how to protect your organisation from ransomware, details can be found here: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/protecting-your-organisation-ransomware

Key Protect advice for individuals:

  • Install system and application updates on all devices as soon as they become available.
  • Install anti-virus software on all devices and keep it updated.
  • Create regular backups of your important files to a device (such as an external hard drive or memory stick) that isn’t left connected to your computer as any malware infection could spread to that too.
  • Only install apps from official app stores, such as Google’s Play Store, or Apple’s App Store as they offer better levels of protection than some 3rd party stores. Jailbreaking, rooting, or disabling any of the default security features of your device will make it more susceptible to malware infections.

Phishing/smishing
Fraudsters may exploit this high profile incident and use it as part of phishing/smishing campaigns. We urge people to be cautious if they receive any unsolicited communications from the NHS. The protect advice for that is the following:

  • An email address can be spoofed. Don’t open attachments or click on the links within any unsolicited emails you receive, and never respond to emails that ask for your personal or financial details.
  • The sender’s name and number in a text message can be spoofed, so even if the message appears to be from an organisation you know of, you should still exercise caution, particularly if the texts are asking you to click on a link or call a number.

Don’t disclose your personal or financial details during a cold call, and remember that the police and banks will never ring you and ask you to verify your PIN, withdraw your cash, or transfer your money to another “safe” account.

If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, please report it to Action Fraud at http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/